Trump, Armageddon and the Return of History

Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons. History does not repeat itself, but it rhymes. Sometimes ascribed to Mark Twain, this bonmot sounds like an increasingly banal truism. But it should give us food for thought and the possibility to ruminate what uses history can be put to in the light of current affairs. And by this…

Conference: Representations, Reflections and Constructs: The international perception of the formative period of Iranian Nationalism (1896-1926) throughout the 20th century

Two photos symbolising the beginning and the end of the period in question: Left, Mirza Kermani who assassinated Nasser al-Din Shah Qajar; Right, the coronation of Reza Shah Pahlavi. Date and time : Friday, 25 November 2016 10.30am-1.15pm and 2.30pm-6.15pm Venue : Salle des colloques, CNRS 27 rue Paul Bert, 94204 Ivry-sur-Seine An International One-Day Scholarly Workshop organised jointly…

Our students win Martin Harris prizes!

A HUGE congratulations from all of us at the History Department to two recent graduates, Bethany Amos and Elena Cotton (both BA Politics and Modern History), who are recipients of this year’s Martin Harris Prizes. To quote the Martin Harris Centre, ‘The 2016 Martin Harris Prize for Cultural Engagement and Social Responsibility has been awarded to…

RESEARCH NEWS: “Opportunities and challenges in the sharing economy” Dr Alexia Yates discusses what Airbnb can tell us about nineteenth-century Paris.

As a historian of cities and economic life, I am interested in how markets transform our understanding and use of space, as well as how local governments grapple with the political and social consequences of those economic changes. Studying real estate as an object with a history offers useful insights for some contemporary urban issues….

RESEARCH NEWS: “Corpses of Mass Violence and Genocide”: Dr Jean-Marc Dreyfus discusses uncovering the ‘forensic turn’ in his recent ERC-funded project.

Skulls displayed at the Nyamata Memorial Site, Rwanda. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons. What was the starting-point for this project? Histories of genocide have tended, to date, towards examining the aftermath of mass violence in relation to issues of trauma and memory, and how these factors shape the subsequent political, cultural, and social characterisations of…

STUDENT LIFE: “Manchester’s treasure trove” Dr Laure Humbert reflects on tips and treasures when using the John Rylands Library.

The interior of the John Rylands University Library. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons. As a historian working on displacement and humanitarianism, I visited many archives in various countries over the course of my PhD. Research trips (particularly abroad) were often pleasant, but at times stressful: I had to find my way around different archival catalogues…

Manchester’s Transnational Friendship with France: James Connolly discusses the ‘adoption’ of Mézières.

The 1921 Lord Mayor’s pageant raising funds for Mézières. Image courtesy of Manchester Central Library: http://www.manchester.gov.uk/news/article/7160/central_library_exhibition_to_celebrate_the_link_between_manchester_and_m%C3%A9zi%C3%A8res My last post touched upon my recent side project on British towns adopting French towns and villages after the First World War. Here, I would like to briefly highlight how this transnational history also had a highly local and…

British Colonialism Built Corruption: Dr Steven Pierce discusses the legacy of empire in Nigeria

It’s nothing new—a politician said something offensive and silly about other countries, angering people around the world. When David Cameron declared last week that Nigeria and Afghanistan were “fantastically corrupt,” my social media accounts blew up. Nigerian friends and commentators were very angry, and rightly so. The sad thing is that Cameron probably doesn’t understand why they’re…